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Thanks to the Stone Soup faculty for providing information on their courses which I used to update the roster of the inaugural cohort of these pioneering faculty and their Stone Soup courses.

Since we started the Project about a year ago, we have engaged almost 1000 students in 40 classes covering 12 subjects, taught by 32 faculty from 25 schools in 3 countries.

Most assignments were in traditional ADR courses, but faculty also used Stone Soup assignments in other courses including Access to Justice, Evidence, Relational Lawyering, Resolving Community Civil Rights Disputes, and Trusts and Estates.

Here’s a table identifying characteristics of their courses and providing links to faculty assessments of the courses.

The table demonstrates the incredible creativity of faculty in tailoring assignments to fit their instructional goals and circumstances. For each course, it shows:

  • Class size
  • Description of the Stone Soup assignment
  • Whether the assignment was required, one option of an assignment, or extra credit
  • Assigned paper length
  • Due date
  • Percentage of grade, if any
  • Whether the results of the assignment were discussed in class

I just added an assessment of Maureen Weston’s Negotiation and Settlement Advocacy course.  She wrote, “This Stone Soup exercise is a particularly useful learning experience which connects students to professionals who engage in negotiation, provides an opportunity for students to utilize their interviewing, networking, and communication skills, and brings together our class readings, discussions to connect theory to practice.  We spend an entire class with students who report on their interview discussions and findings.  It’s a fascinating discussion and always heartening to know that what we teach has value and practical use and to see the students reach out to professionals on a substantive topic.  Thank you!”

Her advice to colleagues considering using Stone Soup: “Do it!”

If you might want to “do it” next year, I’m sure that Stone Soup veterans would be happy to share their experience and advice in more detail.

We will create a roster of colleagues using Stone Soup next year.  I’d love to add you to the list.  If so, please let me know the courses(s) and semester(s) in which you would use Stone Soup.

John Lande is the Isidor Loeb Professor Emeritus and former director of the LLM Program in Dispute Resolution, at the University of Missouri, School of Law. He received his J.D. from Hastings College of Law and Ph.D in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is also an avid writer and contributor to Indisputably.org